My new video – Climate Change Reconsidered II: Fossil Fuels

In the first part of a new video series, I give an outline of Chapter One of Climate Change Reconsidered II: Fossil Fuels, which covers environmental economics. I explain the role of economics in protecting the environment. In a nutshell, it’s this: economic prosperity gives humans the time to care about the environment. Otherwise it’s just a day-to-day battle for survival. As Dr. John Christy put it:

“We are not morally bad people for taking carbon and turning it into the energy that offers life to humanity in a world that would otherwise be brutal,”

“On the contrary, we are good people for doing so.”

“Without energy, life is brutal and short.”

Source: https://web.archive.org/web/20150703181333/http:/www.al.com/opinion/index.ssf/2015/06/uah_climate_scientist_question.html

By the way, this is the very first video production in the new broadcast video studio I setup for Heartland in Chicago about two weeks ago. From it, live streaming to the web, major networks, and video production will be possible. Entirely donated equipment; no “big oil” or political funds were used. Since it was a work week for me when we did this first test, I didn’t have a suit, dress shirt, and tie. So, you’ll have to settle for my polo shirt. 😉

More on the book:

The fifth volume in the Climate Change Reconsidered series, Climate Change Reconsidered II: Fossil Fuels,produced by the Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC), was publicly released on December 4, 2018 in Katowice, Poland — the host city of the 24th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 24) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The 768-page print edition was released in March 2019 and is available for purchase online at the Heartland Institute store and at Amazon.com. A Kindle ebook edition is also available.

Climate Change Reconsidered II: Fossil Fuels assesses the costs and benefits of the use of fossil fuels (principally coal, oil, and natural gas) by reviewing scientific and economic literature on organic chemistry, climate science, public health, economic history, human security, and theoretical studies based on integrated assessment models (IAMs). It is the fifth volume in the Climate Change Reconsidered series and, like the preceding volumes, it focuses on research overlooked or ignored by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Previous volumes in the Climate Change Reconsidered series were published in 200920112013, and 2014. Those volumes — along with separate executive summaries for each report— are available for free online on this site. Use the links on this page or use the pull-down menu that appears when clicking on the tab titled “Volumes” at the top of this page. Print copies can be ordered at The Heartland Institute’s online store or at Amazon.com.

The Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC) is an international network of climate scientists sponsored by three nonprofit organizations: the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change, the Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP), and The Heartland Institute. It was convened in 2003 to provide an independent review of the reports produced by the United Nations’ IPCC.

Additional background information about Climate Change Reconsidered II: Fossil Fuels is available at these links:


Anthony Watts is a senior fellow for climate and environment at The Heartland Institute.

via Watts Up With That?

https://ift.tt/2Y2ScDK

July 14, 2019 at 06:37AM

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