Week in review – climate edition

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye these past few weeks

This is important.  ‘Freshwater forcing of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation revisited’ https://nature.com/articles/s41558-022-01328-2 – ‘the AMOC may not be as sensitive to FW fluxes and Arctic freshening as is currently projected for the end of the twenty-first century’ 

Shifts in water availability due to global tree restoration [link]

International satellite to track impacts of small ocean currents [link]

The 60-year old scientific screwup that helped Covid kill [link]

Salt scourge: the dual threat of warming and rising salinity [link]

Marine Heatwaves Offshore Central and South Chile: Understanding Forcing Mechanisms During the Years 2016-2017: [link]

Saravanan: How to judge a model beauty contest? Model evaluation metrics and meritocracy [link] Note: this is the best new climate science blog i’ve seen in awhile.

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/5/3/034007

The new CMIP6 ensemble of climate models has too many models with high climate sensitivities. End-users need to take that into account in impact studies, argues a new commentary. [link]

How well do we understand the land-ocean-atmosphere carbon cycle? [link]

Global decline in ocean memory over the 21st century [link]

The ocean is still sucking up carbon – maybe more than we think [link]

 ‘Natural Fluctuations’ Dominant Reason For Gulf Stream Changes https://climatechangedispatch.com/study-natural-fluctuations-dominant-reason-for-gulf-stream-changes/ the North Atlantic is cooling – a striking contrast to the majority of ocean regions. , natural fluctuations have been the primary reason for this cooling.

Transforming environmental research to avoid tragedy [link]

A lidar’s eye view of how forests are faring – supporting forest health, wildfire resilience, study wildlife habitats [link]

Did volcanoes accelerate the fall of Chinese Dynasties? [link]

first detection of groundwater beneath an Antarctic ice stream. https://scripps.ucsd.edu/news/groundwater-discovered-sediments-buried-deep-under-antarctic-ice

Predicting slowdowns in decadal climate warming trends with explainable neural networks [link]

How is the ocean anthropogenic carbon reservoir filled? [link]

Improving temperature reconstructions from ice-core water-isotope records. https://cp.copernicus.org/preprints/cp-2021-37/

A new clue to Antarctic ice shelf collapse [link]

A new way to assess global warming potential of short lived pollutants [link]

“Winter and spring climate explains a large portion of interannual variability and trend in western U.S. summer fire burned area” https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/ac6886

Climate change and future pandemics [link]

Greenland’s Vikings may have vanished because lack of water [link]

Global carbon budget 2021 [link]

surface warming, not the wind change, is the primary mechanism for ocean current change. [link]

Robust evidence for the reversal in aerosol effectiveness in reducing climate forcing trend [link]

How the 18.6 year lunar cycle can slightly affect the climate through the modulation of ocean tidal mixing (in a model) – https://egusphere.copernicus.org/preprints/2022/egusphere-2022-151/

California wildfire risk is… tricky. Lots of competing influences to untangle, as in this example projecting up to 30%+ rainfall increases by 2100.  https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2022EF002694?af=R

Two degrees:  the history of climate change’s speed limit [link]

Global warming is speeding up ocean currents.  Here is why [link]

Observational determination of surface radiative forcing by CO2 [link]

Hot springs suggest how the Tibetan Plateau became the roof of the world [link]

linking astronomically-driven climate change to human evolution. [link]

The methane mystery [link]

Arctic was much warmer 6000 years ago 90% of glaciers smaller [link]

Technology and policy

Must read: The new geopolitics of energy [link]

The US has more clean energy projects planned than the grid can handle [link]

Is behavioral public policy a distraction from finding systemic solutions [link]

Vaclav Smil’s new book is a must read “How the World Really Works: The science Behind How We Got Here and Where We’re Going [link]
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The world’s first electrochemical ocean CO2 removal plant is live [link]
Booming offset industry: cut CO2 or just line pockets? [link]
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Beijing’s green fist:  How environmental policy became a tool of state control [link]
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The democrats really are that dense about climate change [link]
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To get off Russian fossil gas, Germany is going big on deploying electric and hybrid heat pumps. This will have ripple effects that make this tech cheaper worldwide. One more way that Putin’s war is accelerating the clean energy transition. [link]
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Air conditioning should be a human right in the climate crisis.  We need to protect vulnerable people from killer heat without destroying the environment [link]
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“Africa needs more energy… The dearth of power hurts livelihoods and destroys the dreams of hundreds of millions of young people.”  The hypocrisy of rich countries’ climate policies [link]
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Fighting climate change and poverty – at the same time [link]
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Is wind power economically viable? [link]
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An ambitious project to bring hydropower from Canada to New England is on the brink of defeat after conservationists, Native Americans, concerned residents and rival energy companies waged a rowdy campaign to kill it. [link]
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Gathering early intelligence about potential disasters is an integral part of Nepal’s National Adaptation Plan to increase climate resilience between 2021 and 2050. Learn more: http://wrld.bg/FiUI50IZpQw
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Thirty years of science-society interfaces: What’s next? [link]
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New open access book:  Wicked problems in public policy: understanding and responding to complex challenges [link]
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The only real way to achieve energy independence (& price stability) is through electrification. https://rewiringamerica.org/circuit-breakers-energy-independence
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Biden’s nuclear bailout a messy necessity [link]
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India to reopen more than 100 coal mines as energy crisis worsens [link]
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The future of water access in Peru might be in engineering practices from 1,400 years ago [link]
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How Oslo learned to fight climate change [link]
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Wastewater testing is key to monitoring the spread of COVID-19 in the next stage of the pandemic, [link]
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The agricultural climate blame game [link]
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Whose land is it anyways?  Energy futures and land use [link]
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Pitting environmentalists against each other [link]
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Blame game: consumption-based versus income-based carbon footprints [link]
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Materials demand for electricity in climate change mitigation [link]
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Unveiling hidden energy poverty using the energy equity gap [link]
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Assessing water infrastructure investments in California [link]
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New IPCC report underscores critical role of carbon capture [link]
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Equity in water resources planning: a path forward for decision makers [link]
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American policy conflicts in the hothouse: exploring the politics of climate inaction in polycentric rebellion [link]
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“Too often, our lens for assessing climate proposals is ideological rather than pragmatic.” [link]
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“Research shows that such maladaptation can reinforce the vulnerability of those the intervention is meant to assist; or it can shift vulnerability onto other people or places. It can even create entirely new sources of vulnerability.” [link]
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A Code of Conduct Is Imperative for Ocean Carbon Dioxide Removal Research [link]
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How Russia made the world more food insecure [link]
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There’s no scenario in which 2050 is normal [link]
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West Virginia, a coal state, is going nuclear [link]
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World lacks time, not minerals for climate saving technology [link]
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Burning renewable wood to help the climate? [link]
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‘The Supply Chain Does Not Exist’: Green Energy Industry Is In For A Rude Awakening http://dlvr.it/SPZqFZ
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21 renewable energy advantages and disadvantages [link]
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Seeds of hope: How nature inspires scientists to confront climate change [link]
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Scientists devised an ingenious low-cost system that pulls water from the air, allowing crop development in arid regions around the world: [link]
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A quiet revolution: southwest cities learn to thrive amid drought [link]
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Wind Projects Rejected In NE & OH, Rejections Across U.S. Now Total 328 Since 2015 [link]
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The dangers of population implosion [link]
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Drought in the SW US:  managing risk, adaptation and preparing for the worst [link]
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California gearing up to win Darwin Award for world’s worst energy policies [link]
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Clean energy does not end the energy security game – it reshuffles it [link]
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Think bigger about remote work [link]
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World’s first floating city [link]
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Expanding ocean food production under climate change [link]
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We need 4 waves of climate action:  not just the “what” but the “when” [link]
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Why are nature-based solutions on climate being overlooked?  they are cheap, effective and grossly underfunded [link]
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A research agenda towards disaster risk management pathways in multi-(hazard-)risk assessment [link]
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A drowning world: Keny’s quiet slide underwater [link]
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Sri Lanka banned the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides last April. The result was brutal and swift, plunging the nation into a deep economic and humanitarian crisis.[link]
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Reframing agriculture [link]
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Matthew Kahn:  The economic consequences of youth pessimism about climate risk. [link]
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The idea of energy efficiency needs to be reinvented [link]
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Finland is on the brink of a nuclear power game changer [link]
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Climate neutrality on state dairy farms within reach [link]
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Pentagon to build nuclear microreactors to power far-flung bases [link]

About science and scientists

Smarter people are more likely to endorse freedom of speech. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1948550619896168

“It’ll take more than professorial op-eds… to get our nation back to a place where we can disagree without wanting to ruin the lives of people with whom we have… disagreements. [link]

Breaking the certainty trap [link]

On effective activism and intellectual honesty [link]

Dismantling the ivory tower’s knowledge boundaries [link]

Musk, twitter and moderation [link]

Elon Musk: “He’s made very consumerist products in a way that offends the sensibility of climate activists who think we need to be tightening our belts. He wants everyone to have a high-consumerist lifestyle and a low-carbon one, and it just creates so much friction”  [link]

Scientific conclusions need not be accurate, justified, or believed by their authors. https://philpapers.org/archive/DANSCN.pdf

Diverse viewpoints, one truth [link]

“The false equivalence of academic freedom and free speech” https://acme-journal.org/index.php/acme/article/view/1715

The dangers of lying to ourselves about the future [link]

Dorian Shuyler Abbot: Science and Politics: Three Principles, Three Fables [link]

Daniel Kahneman shared his insights on how we make decisions, the “noise” that besets human judgments, and how organizations can improve decision-making. Read: http://ow.ly/j7SF50IMXob
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Willingness to accept criticism is the key to learning [link]
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Why the past decade has been uniquely stupid [link]
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Leading by example: a quiet but effective form of activism [link]
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via Climate Etc.

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May 14, 2022 at 12:27PM

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