Arctic Ice Ignores Alarmist Predictions

By Paul Homewood


A year ago the media was full of fake Arctic heatwave news:



13 December 2016 • 9:14pm

The Arctic shattered heat records in the past year as unusually warm air triggered massive melting of ice and snow and a late fall freeze, US government scientists said on Tuesday.


The grim assessment came in the Arctic Report Card 2016, a peer-reviewed document by 61 scientists around the globe issued by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The NOAA report covers from October 2015 to September 2016, a period it said the Arctic’s average annual air temperature over land was the highest on record.

"The report card this year clearly shows a stronger and more pronounced signal of persistent warming than any previous year in our observational record" going back to 1900, NOAA Arctic Research Program director Jeremy Mathis told the American Geophysical Union conference in San Francisco, where the report was released.

"Those warming effects in the Arctic have had a cascading effect through the environment."

Climate scientists say the reasons for the rising heat include the burning of fossil fuels that emit heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, southerly winds that pushed hot air from the mid-latitudes northward, as well as the El Nino ocean warming trend, which ended mid-year.

The Arctic’s annual air temperature over land was 6.3 degrees Fahrenheit (3.5 degrees Celsius) higher than in 1900, the report said.

The sea surface temperature in the peak summer month of August 2016 reached nine degrees Fahrenheit (five degrees Celsius) above the average for 1982-2010 in the Barents and Chukchi seas and off the east and west coasts of Greenland.

"Warm air and ocean temperatures in the fall led to a record-breaking delay in fall freeze-up," Perovich said, noting that the Arctic sea ice minimum from mid-October to late November was the lowest since the satellite record began in 1979.

Scientists added a section to the report about noteworthy records set in October and November 2016, even though that extended beyond the report’s typical time span.

More of the ice that freezes in the Arctic winter is thin, made of only a single year’s worth of freeze rather than thicker, more resistant ice built up over multiple years.

In 1985, almost half (45 percent) of Arctic sea ice was called "multi-year ice."

Now, just 22 percent of the Arctic is covered in multi-year ice. The rest is first-year ice.

In Greenland, the ice sheet continued to shrink and lose mass as it has every year since 2002, when satellite measurements began.

Melting also started early in Greenland last year, the second earliest in the 37-year record of observations, and close to the record set in 2012.


And a year later?


Arctic sea ice extent this October was the third highest since 2006, and continues to track recent years.




Most of the Arctic basin is full of 2 meter+ thick ice, in stark contrast to 2008:





The Greenland ice cap grew by almost record amounts in 2016/17, and has started off this season above average as well:




Temperatures across the Arctic have changed little in the last decade, and are at a similar level to the 1930s.




And even the explorer Pen Hadow had to give up his attempt to sail to the North Pole, after coming up against a barrier of thick ice only two weeks into his journey from Alaska:




As I pointed out a year ago, the usual band of suspects had picked on a single and not unprecedented weather event to “prove” that global warming was melting the Arctic.

Not for the first time they have been proved wrong.


November 21, 2017 at 12:43PM

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