Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation modulates the impacts of Arctic sea ice decline [link]

New article: The Ross Sea Dipole – temperature, snow accumulation and sea ice variability in the Ross Sea region, Antarctica, over the past 2700 years  [link]

New paper on rainfall changes in  [link

Could More Snow in Antarctica Slow Sea Level Rise? [link]

Shedding light on the southern ocean CO2 sink [link]

Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise’ film shows how farmers are fighting climate change [link]

Contributions of natural climate changes and human activities to the trend of extreme precipitation [link]

Northern Galápagos corals reveal twentieth century warming in the eastern tropical Pacific’ [link]

Changes in glacier dynamics in the northern Antarctic Peninsula since 1985 [link]

New article: The Ross Sea Dipole – temperature, snow accumulation and sea ice variability in the Ross Sea region, Antarctica, over the past 2700 years [link]

Suggests substantial cirrus cloud thinning could result from a deployment of stratospheric aerosol , they find that it could almost double the cooling effect! [link]

‘Lack of cool, not warm extremes, distinguishes late 20th Century climate in 979-year Tasmanian summer temperature reconstruction’ [link]

How ocean affect motion of & loss from & ice sheets [link]

Chaos Theory, The Butterfly Effect, And The Computer Glitch That Started It All: For centuries, we thought that the Universe was completely deterministic. But even if you know all the rules, you can’t get rid of chaos. [link

ENSO-stratosphere pathways [link

New modeling study concludes that human-caused climate change signal won’t be seen in hurricane damage to 2100, under all scenarios (even RCP 8.5), due to large internal variability [link]

New modeling study concludes that human-caused climate change signal won’t be seen in hurricane damage to 2100, under all scenarios (even RCP 8.5), due to large internal variability [link]

Changing response of the North Atlantic/European winter climate to the 11 year solar cycle [link]

The US warming hole [link] [link]

How enhanced weathering could slow climate change [link]

Deep Bore Into Antarctica Finds Freezing Ice, Not Melting as Expected [link]

The Radiative Forcing of Aerosol–Cloud Interactions in Liquid Clouds: Wrestling and Embracing Uncertainty [link]

Contrasting local and remote impacts of surface heating on polar warming and amplification [link]

Investigating the Uncertainty in Global SST Trends Due to Internal Variations Using an Improved Trend Estimator [link]

What causes drought, and why are they so hard to predict? [link]

“Energy transport, polar amplification, and ITCZ shifts in the GeoMIP G1 ensemble”. [link]

New York City Impacts on a Regional Heat Wave [link]

Increased West Antarctic and unchanged East Antarctic ice discharge over the last 7 years [link]

Latest words of wisdom from Oreskes: Climate Change Attribution: When Is It Appropriate to Accept New Methods? [link]

“The team found that a layer of fresh, cold water that melts off the bottom of the ice shelf acts like insulation, protecting the underside of the shelf from melting further” [link]

Warm Arctic−cold Siberia: comparing the recent and the early 20th-century Arctic warmings [link]

Klotzbach and Pielke’s new paper on US hurricanes [link

Social Science & Policy

Why current emissions policies remain magical thinking [link]

The hypocrisy of the California cities suing the oil companies over climate change.  Richard Epstein: Cross examination is going to be brutal [link]

What attribution could lead to in the legal world.  Better climate science has opened the door to lawsuits against big oil. [link]

Focus: Climate change and the social sciences [link]

Enlightenment Environmentalism: The Case for Ecomodernism ’s new essay in the Journal [link]

Countries are not living up their Paris promises. [link]

Managing climate related financial risk [link]

13 Youths ‘in a Position of Danger’ Sue Washington State Over Climate Crisis [link]

Are negative emissions technologies as risky as the problem they are designed to fix? [link]

Nearly all European countries are net importers of greenhouse gas emissions (from the production of goods and services in other countries) [link]

The past present and future of human evolution [link]

Insightful article from Sheila Jasanoff: Just transitions: A humble approach to global energy futures [link]

I am an environmentalist. And I work for the and industry. Change the way you think [link] 

Does climate change cause more war? [link]

About Science and Scientists

Out today: impact factor correlates with bad methodology and indicates, consequently, unreliable science:

The “world of bad data practice [divided] into five key themes: Honest Statistical/Computing Error, Honest Misunderstanding of Data, Honest Misapplication of Methods, Honest Failure to Normalize and Malicious Manipulation.” How bad data practice is leading to bad research [link]

. University professor cancels course on freedom of speech because the students could not stand freedom of speech. [link]

Amy Wax: What can’t be debated on campus [link]

Should we assume that science outlets that receive funding from industry are biased or dishonest? [link

Derailing science. Study: “ad hominem attacks may have the same degree of impact as attacks on the empirical basis of the science claims” [link]

Train PhD students to be thinkers not just specialists [link]

Being female in science [link] .

via Climate Etc.

http://ift.tt/2EQBASF

February 24, 2018 at 11:43AM

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