Climate Change to Destroy National Parks… Film at Eleven.

Guest ridicule by David Middleton

Note: The featured image is of thankfully former President Obama babbling about climate change at Yosemite National Park in 2016.  While not part of the article being addressed in this post… It’s sort of a prequel to it.

From “The Stupid, It Burns” files…

Energy and Environment

Climate change is destroying our national parks at an alarming rate, study finds

By Alex Horton

September 25

By 2100, visitors walking the grounds of California’s Joshua Tree National Park may view exhibits showing what will have been lost — the spiky yucca palms that inspired the park’s name, dwindled to a few rare husks.

Climate change could kill most of the park’s iconic trees, wildfires may transform the towering conifer forests at Yellowstone National Park into scarred grasslands, and once-mighty ice sheets in the north will probably melt and flow into the sea, making Glacier National Park both an obsolete name and a hard lesson about environmental degradation.

A new study published Monday has warned that climate change has adversely and uniquely affected many of the 417 national parks spread across the United States and its territories, according to scientists from the University of California at Berkeley and University of Wisconsin.

[…]

Researchers looked at data between 1895 and 2010 and concluded temperatures in national parks increased twice as much compared with other parts of the country, while precipitation fell dramatically at those parks.

That is because parks are often in places sensitive to shifts in climate. Many parks are at high elevation, where the Earth warms quickly due to a thinner atmosphere, researchers said. Alaska is severely affected because melting snow uncovers darker surfaces that absorb heat.

[…]

Washington Post

 

Dude! Climate change created most of our national parks.

Where to begin?

Climate change will apparently turn Joshua Tree National Park into a desert!

Dude!  It is a fracking desert…

Dude! It’s actually two deserts!

Where Two Deserts Meet

Two distinct desert ecosystems, the Mojave and the Colorado, come together in Joshua Tree National Park. A fascinating variety of plants and animals make their homes in a land sculpted by strong winds and occasional torrents of rain. Dark night skies, a rich cultural history, and surreal geologic features add to the wonder of this vast wilderness in southern California. Come explore for yourself.

[…]

NPS

Wildfires may transform the towering conifer forests at Yellowstone National Park into scarred grasslands…

Dude!  Yellowstone got over this, several times…

How many giant eruptions have occurred in the Yellowstone National Park region and how large were they?

Volcanic activity began in the Yellowstone National Park region a little before about 2 million years ago. Molten rock ( magma) rising from deep within the Earth produced three cataclysmic eruptions more powerful than any in the world’s recorded history. The first caldera-forming eruption occurred about 2.1 million years ago. The eruptive blast removed so much magma from its subsurface storage reservoir that the ground above it collapsed into the magma chamber and left a gigantic depression in the ground- a hole larger than the state of Rhode Island. The huge crater, known as a caldera, measured as much as 80 kilometers long, 65 kilometers wide, and hundreds of meters deep, extending from outside of Yellowstone National Park into the central area of the Park (see map in question above for location information).

Later, activity shifted to a smaller region within the Island Park area of eastern Idaho, just southwest of Yellowstone National Park, and produced another large caldera-forming eruption 1.3 million years ago. Subsequent activity has been focused within the area of the National Park, and another huge eruption 640,000 years ago formed the Yellowstone caldera as we now see it.

The three caldera-forming eruptions, respectively, were about 6,000, 700, and 2,500 times larger than the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Washington State. Together, the three catastrophic eruptions expelled enough ash and lava to fill the Grand Canyon.

In addition to the three climactic eruptions, activity associated with each of the three caldera cycles produced dozens or even hundreds of smaller eruptions that produced both lava and pyroclastic materials.

USGS

 

And once-mighty ice sheets in the north will probably melt and flow into the sea, making Glacier National Park both an obsolete name and a hard lesson about environmental degradation.

Dude!  They’re not ice sheets!

What is an ice sheet?

An ice sheet is a mass of glacial land ice extending more than 50,000 square kilometers (20,000 square miles). The two ice sheets on Earth today cover most of Greenland and Antarctica. During the last ice age, ice sheets also covered much of North America and Scandinavia.

NSIDC

Dude! The once-mighty ice sheets in the north DID melt and DID flow into the sea… many times!

Dude! This is what once-mighty ice sheets in the north melting looks like…

Dude! This is what once-mighty ice sheets in the north flowing into the sea looks like…

Dude! The alpine/valley glaciers of Glacier National Park aren’t the last stand of the “once-mighty ice sheets in the north.”  They most likely formed about 7,000 years ago (~5,000 BC) and generally advanced until the mid-1800’s, a period known as Neoglaciation.

Dude!

 

History of Glaciers in Glacier National Park

The history of glaciation within current Glacier National Park boundaries spans centuries of glacial growth and recession, carving the features we see today. Glaciers were present within current Glacier National Park boundaries as early as 7,000 years ago but may have survived an early Holocene warm period (Carrara, 1989), making them much older. These modest glaciers varied in size, tracking climatic changes, but did not grow to their Holocene maximum size until the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA) around A.D. 1850. While they may not have formed in their entirety during the LIA, their maximum perimeters can be documented through mapping of lateral and terminal moraines. (Key, 2002) The extent and mass of these glaciers, as well as glaciers around the globe, has clearly decreased during the 20th century in response to warmer temperatures.

Climate reconstructions representative of the Glacier National Park region extend back multiple centuries and show numerous long-duration drought and wet periods that influenced the mass balance of glaciers (Pederson et al. 2004). Of particular note was an 80-year period (~1770-1840) of cool, wet summers and above-average winter snowfall that led to a rapid growth of glaciers just prior to the end of the LIA. Thus, in the context of the entire Holocene, the size of glaciers at the end of the LIA was an anomaly of sorts. In fact, the large extent of ice coverage removed most of the evidence of earlier glacier positions by overriding terminal and lateral moraines.

Tree-ring based climate records and historic photographs indicate the initiation of frontal recession and ice mass thinning between A.D. 1860 and 1880. The alignment of decadal-scale climate anomalies over the early 20th century produced a period of glacial recession somewhat analogous to conditions experienced over the past few decades. The coupling of hot, dry summers with substantial decreases in winter snowpack (~30% of normal) produced dramatic recession rates as high as 100 m/yr from A.D. 1917-1941 (Pederson et al. 2004). These multidecadal episodes have substantially impacted the mass balance of glaciers since A.D. 1900.

USGS

Dude! Would you prefer that they continued to expand?  The brief increase in glacial mass balance in the mid-20th Century was one of the stars of That 70’s Climate Science Show

As if this wasn’t enough, the “journalist” just had to make the stupid burn brighter…

Researchers looked at data between 1895 and 2010 and concluded temperatures in national parks increased twice as much compared with other parts of the country, while precipitation fell dramatically at those parks.

That is because parks are often in places sensitive to shifts in climate. Many parks are at high elevation, where the Earth warms quickly due to a thinner atmosphere, researchers said. Alaska is severely affected because melting snow uncovers darker surfaces that absorb heat.

Dude!  National parks are experiencing twice as much climate change because they are located in places sensitive to climate change???

Dude!. At least you’re not as stupid as this:clown:

Dude! Do you even have the slightest clue that glacial valleys, like the one you were lecturing us from, are the result of drastic climate change?

The Scientific Basis

The “study”: Disproportionate magnitude of climate change in United States national parks

The lead author:

Patrick Gonzalez
Associate Adjunct Professor, UC Berkeley

[…]

Education
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Energy and Resources, University of California, Berkeley, 1997 (Dissertation Chair John P. Holdren)

Master of Science (M.S.), Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, 1987

Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Natural Resources, Cornell University, 1986

UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley’s Energy and Resources Group is a prototypical enviro-psychobabble department set up to teach non-science majors how to sound all sciencey while spouting nonsense about energy and resources…

THE ENERGY AND RESOURCES GROUP
ERG is a col­lab­o­ra­tive com­mu­nity of grad­u­ate stu­dents, core fac­ulty, over 150 affil­i­ated fac­ulty and researchers across the cam­pus, and over 500 alumni across the globe. We award MA, MS, and PhD degrees to stu­dents work­ing across dis­ci­plines and depart­ments to cre­ate poten­tially trans­for­ma­tive knowl­edge for the planet and its peo­ple. ERG is a world-renowned pro­gram with a 40-year his­tory of out­stand­ing research, edu­ca­tion and outreach to gov­ern­ment, indus­try, and civil soci­ety at the state, national and inter­na­tional levels.

 

ERG MISSION
The mission of the Energy and Resources Group is a sustainable environment and a just society.

ERG actively promotes intellectual, racial, ethnic, and gender inclusion; researches the impacts of equality and inequality; and celebrates diversity in our community.

UC Berkeley

The ERG was founded by none other than, John P. Holdren.

via Watts Up With That?

https://ift.tt/2RfmSvd

October 1, 2018 at 08:21AM

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: