UN Climate Ritual: Ministerial Meetings Fails To Resolve Deadlock

Even as a few developed countries started to put some money on the table to show their commitment to mobilising funds for climate change, none of the issues related to finance could be resolved by the negotiators till late on Monday night at the climate change conference here.

At the two-week year-ending climate conference in Katowice, Poland, countries are trying to finalise the rulebook, containing the processes and guidelines, for the implementation of the landmark 2015 Paris Agreement that seeks to keep the global average temperatures from rising above 2 degree Celsius from the pre-industrial times. The issues under discussion here are mainly procedural in nature and deal with the details of the processes and mechanisms through which the provisions of the Paris Agreement will be implemented. Many of these are also extremely complicated and contentious.

At the two-week year-ending climate conference in Katowice, Poland, countries are trying to finalise the rulebook, containing the processes and guidelines, for the implementation of the landmark 2015 Paris Agreement that seeks to keep the global average temperatures from rising above 2 degree Celsius from the pre-industrial times. The issues under discussion here are mainly procedural in nature and deal with the details of the processes and mechanisms through which the provisions of the Paris Agreement will be implemented. Many of these are also extremely complicated and contentious.

The ministerial group on finance, comprising Egypt’s Minister of Environment Yasmine Fouad and the German state secretary at the federal Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety Jochen Flasbarth, had a long list of issues to resolve. Among them is the fight over the nature and level of reporting that needs to be done by the developed countries on the finances they provide to the developing world to deal with climate change.

Developed countries are under an obligation ‘mobilise’ at least US$ 100 billion every year from the year 2020 to help the developing countries fight climate change. The Paris Agreement requires the developed countries to report information every two years about the money it was likely to provide in future, and the money that it had already provided in the previous two years.

How this will be done, and the nature of information to be provided, needs to be spelled out in the rule-book. But some developed countries have now been arguing that they were not in a position to report advance information on the money they were likely to provide in future because of constitutional and budgetary constraints. The developing countries, on the other hand, have countered saying they were only seeking “indicative” amounts.

Developing countries also want to ensure that money provided by developed nations was “new and additional” to the money already flowing in other forms, and want specific mention of this in the rule-book. However, the phrase “new and additional” is not mentioned in the Paris Agreement, and developed countries do not want it in the rule-book either.

There were several other issues related to finance under discussion, like the future of Adaptation Fund, an instrument under the Kyoto Protocol, which runs till 2020 before being replaced by Paris Agreement. Developing countries have been asking for a smooth transition of the Adaptation Fund, which was being used to fund adaptation projects, to the Paris Agreement, and this needs to be specified in the rulebook. But there is no consensus as of now on how to achieve this.

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The post UN Climate Ritual: Ministerial Meetings Fails To Resolve Deadlock appeared first on The Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF).

via The Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF)

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December 11, 2018 at 03:38AM

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