Saturday Stupidity: Epic fail by @ourplanet

If you’re a person who watched Walt Disney on TV as a kid, you probably remember one of the most epic wildlife films ever produced by Disney where a steady stream of lemmings was jumping over a cliff. This was attributed to lemmings just being stupid or having bad eyesight and has become a global meme ever since. The word “lemmings” has become synonymous with jumping over a cliff without thinking.

The problem however with the Disney film is that it wasn’t true; it was all staged by the producers and the camera people. This was found out years later by an investigation done by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

From the Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game

The “pack of lemmings” reaches the final precipice. “This is the last chance to turn back,” Hibbler states. “Yet over they go, casting themselves out bodily into space.”

Lemmings are seen flying into the water. The final shot shows the sea awash with dying lemmings.

Certainly, some scenes in nature documentaries are staged. In Sir David Attenborough’s recent documentary, “The Life of Birds,” the close-up footage of a flying duck, filmed razor-sharp from the bird’s wingtip, was shot from a car using a mallard drake trained to fly alongside the car. But faking an entirely mythical event is something else.

Back to the present day, a television program by the name of Our Planet is produced by the BBC and stars Sir David Attenborough the same noted naturalist that staged the flying duck scene. On a recent program they showed walruses falling over a cliff and acting like lemmings themselves attributed this terrible thing to “climate change”, which has become the “universal boogeyman” for lemming like professional journalists.

There’s only one problem, like the Disney story it wasn’t true, and it wasn’t due to climate change.

From the Bishop Hill website, written by Andrew Montford:


My article on walruses appeared behind the paywall at the Spectator Coffee House blog earlier this week. 

Over the weekend, social media and the newspapers were full of stories of Pacific walruses plunging over sea cliffs to their deaths. Heart-wrenching film of the corpses of these magnificent beasts piled up on the shore have been driving many to tears.

This all came about as the result of the latest episode of Our Planet, the new wildlife extravaganza from Netflix. As is normal for such programmes, the story that accompanies the animal eye-candy is told by Sir David Attenborough and, as is positively compulsory, it is spiced with multiple references to the horrors of global warming. In fact, we are told, it is us who should shoulder the blame for the slaughter of the walruses, because shrinking sea ice caused by climate change forces them to haulout – leaving the water to take refuge on the shore instead.

The programme ends with Attenborough directing viewers to a website run by WWF, the co-producers of the series. It is therefore, in essence, an eight-part, multi-million pound fundraiser.

Which is a pity, because there is now considerable evidence emerging that the story is not quite what it seems.

For a start, as the zoologist Susan Crockford has documented for the GWPF, walrus haul out behaviour may not be related to global warming. In her 2014 paper On the Beach, she cites examples as far back as the 1930s, long before global warming. She also explains that there doesn’t appear to be a strong correlation between sea-ice levels and haulout behaviour.

Nor is the phenomenon of walruses falling to their deaths from sea cliffs new. American TV recorded the same phenomenon in 1994 and the New York Times reported 60 deaths in a single incident in 1996. Attempts were made to install a fence at one site, while another employs rangers whose sole job is to keep the walruses away from the cliffs. At the time, scientists explained that the most likely explanation  was overcrowding at the water’s edge.

Crockford thinks that the footage on the Netflix show comes from a well-documented incident that took place in the village of Ryrkaypiy, in eastern Siberia, in October 2017. September and October are the peak period for walrus haulouts, and there are numerous examples, which date back to the 1960s, of the cliff phenomenon taking place on Wrangel Island, a few hundred kilometres to the north.

However in 2017, as the Siberian Times reported, the colony attracted polar bears that frequent – and indeed at the time terrorise – the area. The bears drove several hundred walruses over the cliffs to their deaths, before feasting on the corpses. They continued to frequent the area right through into the winter.

I’ve been able to show that Crockford’s supposition about the geographical origin of the footage is correct: analysis of the rock shapes in the film and in a photo taken by the producer/director both match archive photos of Ryrkaypiy. The photo was taken on 19 September 2017, during the events described by the Siberian Times.

But whereas the Siberian Times and Gizmodo website, which also reported on the 2017 incident, were both quite clear that the walruses were driven over the cliffs by polar bears, Netflix makes no mention of their presence. Similarly, there is no mention of the fact that walrus haulouts are entirely normal. Instead, Attenborough tells his viewers that climate change is forcing the walruses on shore, where their poor eyesight leads them to plunge over the cliffs.

This is all very troubling as it raises the possibility that Netflix and the WWF are, innocently or otherwise, party to a deception of the public. Exactly who was aware of the presence of polar bears remains unclear, but it seems doubtful that no one at the WWF and the production team was unaware. And given that one of the prime objectives of the show seems to have been to raise funds for WWF, that seems… problematic.


Josh has his take on it:

CartoonsbyJosh.com

via Watts Up With That?

http://bit.ly/2Iwtsf6

April 13, 2019 at 04:18PM

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