Oregon Wildfire Trends

By Paul Homewood

h/t WUWT

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Many of you will be aware of the chart below, which shows clearly that wildfires in the US used to be many worse prior to the Second World War, before the days of intensive and systematic fire suppression:

 

 

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https://web.archive.org/web/20140913135647/http://www.fs.fed.us:80/research/sustain/criteria-indicators/indicators/indicator-316.php

 

The report has disappeared from the USDA website, but is still available on Wayback.

In similar fashion, the official data table showing fire statistics back to 1926, as still available below on Wayback, has also disappeared from the National Interagency Fire Center’s website

image

http://web.archive.org/web/20200408053855/https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/fireInfo_stats_totalFires.html

 

Instead they only offer data since 1983, with the feeble excuse that they used to use different reporting processes in the past:

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https://www.nifc.gov/fire-information/statistics/wildfires

However it is not possible for the authorities to cover up the truth forever.

For instance a report published in 2017 by the Oregon Board of Forestry told exactly the same story, that wildfires used to be much worse:

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Oregon Fire History

 

It is well accepted amongst forestry experts that decades of fire suppression have led to the build of fuel loads, which have been the cause of the massive fires we see more often nowadays.

But a comparison back to 1983 only, which the authorities prefer you to see, is also skewed, because the 1980s and 90s were relatively wet decades in the Northwest and California, where the majority of fires now occur. It is no surprise that we see bigger fires now.

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Climate at a Glance | National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) (noaa.gov)

via NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

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September 17, 2022 at 06:14AM

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