Coal Comeback Spurs New CO2 Emissions Growth, Says BP

Global greenhouse gas emissions began rising again last year as the first pick-up in coal burning since 2013 overshadowed a record expansion in renewable energy, a BP report said.

Energy demand accelerated in 2017 by 2.2 percent, but a 17 percent gain in clean power such as solar and wind did little to offset the dominance of fossil fuels in the rapidly expanding global economy.

Demand for hydrocarbons rose across the board, led by a 3 percent increase in natural gas consumption, the fastest since 2010, followed by a 1.8 percent rise in oil demand which far exceeded the average of the previous 10 years, data in BP’s benchmark annual Statistical Review of World Energy showed.

(GRAPHIC: Global GDP and energy growth – reut.rs/2y5Rqdd)

Reuters Graphic

(GRAPHIC: Energy fuel mix -BP – reut.rs/2MkpDZE)

Reuters Graphic

The opening of new coal-fired power plants in India and China drove coal consumption higher by 1 percent, highlighting the difficulties developing economies face in meeting demand for electricity while fighting pollution.

BP and other oil companies such as Royal Dutch Shell have led calls to reduce carbon emissions by converting coal power plants to cleaner natural gas.

Still, the share of coal in power generation today remains around 38 percent, practically unchanged since 1997, while the share of non-fossil fuels slightly dipped as nuclear power capacity shrunk, BP Chief Economist Spencer Dale said.

Full story

via The Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF)

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June 13, 2018 at 11:51AM

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