More “Climate Change Killing Plants” Twaddle

By Paul Homewood

h/t Mark E Roberts

 

The Conversation is always good for a laugh:

 

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Weather patterns across the U.S. have felt like a roller coaster ride for the past several months. December and January were significantly warmer than average in many locations, followed by February’s intense cold wave and a dramatic warmup.

If you’ve ever seen lilac bushes crushed by snowdrifts, then budding on a warm day just a few weeks later, you may wonder how plants tolerate such extremes. I study how climate change affects the timing of seasonal events in the life cycles of plants, birds and insects in Massachusetts, so I know that species have evolved here to handle New England’s famously changeable weather. But a warming climate is disrupting weather patterns and testing the abilities of many species to adapt.

Climate change scrambles the signals

Plants are highly attuned to temperature signals, so warming driven by climate change is making it harder for many species to withstand winter cold and spring frosts. As spring temperatures get warmer than in the past, trees such as apples and pears may respond by leafing out and flowering several weeks earlier than normal. This can increase their vulnerability to late frosts.

Such late frosts are becoming more common because climate change is destabilizing the jet stream, leading it to dip much farther south, bringing bursts of unusually cold weather.

https://theconversation.com/january-warm-spells-march-freezes-how-plants-manage-the-shift-from-winter-to-spring-155343

 

It’s the same cartload of rubbish we always get at this time of year. Perhaps the author might have checked the NOAA weather data for his own Northeast region, before he made a fool of himself.

Temperatures have always swung wildly from year to year in winter and early spring.

Furthermore it has not been getting warmer in January, February, March or April. And cold snaps in April are now much less frequent than they used to be, rather making a mockery of his claim that ”such late frosts are becoming more common because climate change is destabilizing the jet stream, leading it to dip much farther south, bringing bursts of unusually cold weather”.

 

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Climate at a Glance | National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) (noaa.gov)

 

 

The author is Professor of Biology at Boston University. I suggest he sticks to trees and avoids writing about matters he clearly does no understand.

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via NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

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March 4, 2021 at 10:18AM

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