A quarter of the US believe they know someone who died from the Covid vaccines

By Jo Nova

Seeding the ground for a revolution?

Despite the censorship and the gagging of doctors, somehow, against the odds, nearly half of the US population believes it’s at least “somewhat likely” that Covid vaccines have killed people.  Astonishingly over a quarter said they personally know someone who has died and whose death may have been linked to vaccination.

CEmetary, death, mortality.

The population is now starkly divided. When someone dies unexpectedly, half the nation is wondering if it was caused by the vaccines, but another third think those people are just spreading conspiracies.

It follows (surely) that some significant slab of the West has had a profound loss of trust in our health institutions and the government. It is also an indictment of most of the legacy media which hasn’t mentioned vaccine side effects at all. Half the population know they are not telling the truth. How is this sustainable?

Rasmussen Reports

Twenty-eight percent (28%) of adults say they personally know someone whose death they think may have been caused by side effects of COVID-19 vaccines, while 61% don’t and another 10% are not sure.

The documentary Died Suddenly has been criticized as promoting “debunked” anti-vaccine conspiracy theories but has been seen by some 15 million people.

Forty-eight percent (48%) of Americans believe there are legitimate reasons to be concerned about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, while 37% think people who worry about vaccine safety are spreading conspiracy theories. Another 15% are not sure.

How many lives have been touched by “unexplained deaths”?

Somewhere between one fifth and one half of the population may know of “an unexplained death”. Twice as many unvaccinated people say they do:

Similarly, while 45% of those who have not been vaccinated against COVID-19 think someone they know personally might have died from vaccine side effects, only 22% of vaccinated adults think so.

The unvaccinated may be overestimating the deaths just as the vaccinated may be underestimating them. Either way, if one in four people know someone who died unexpectedly, that’s still an awful lot of deaths.

About 7% of vaccinees say they had a major side effect

One month ago in a similar Rasmussen survey results came out suggesting a lot of the population can see the dark side of vaccines for the saddest of reasons:

Sixty-eight percent (68%) of adults say they’ve gotten a COVID-19 vaccination, and a majority (56%) of vaccinated adults report no side effects from the vaccine. Thirty-four percent (34%) say they had minor side effects and seven percent (7%) reported major side effects from the vaccine.

It’s not clear what “major” means. But if 7% of the 70% who are vaccinated had a major reaction, that’s 5% of the whole population. With a household size of three in the US, that means 15% of the population live with someone who had a bad reaction.

Concerns about vaccines is spread across both sides of politics

Coronavirus-vaccine. Photo

Photo by Hakan Nural on Unsplash

Concern about vaccines leans more to the right, but as many as 44% of Democrats now think there are legitimate reasons to be concerned about the safety of vaccines. Remember when “anti-vaccers” were a fringe minority? Not any more..

Forty-six percent (46%) of adults who have gotten vaccinated against COVID-19 believe people who worry about vaccine safety are spreading conspiracy theories, but just 15% of the unvaccinated share that belief. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of those who haven’t gotten the COVID-19 vaccine think there are legitimate reasons to be concerned about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, as do 40% of those who have gotten vaccinated against the virus.

More Democrats (85%) than Republicans (63%) or those not affiliated with either major party (64%) have been vaccinated against COVID-19. More Republicans (60%) than Democrats (44%) or the unaffiliated (43%) think there are legitimate reasons to be concerned about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. However, there is less political difference in the number who suspect someone they know might have died from vaccine side effects – 33% of Democrats and 26% of both Republicans and the unaffiliated.

The poor doubt the experts while the rich call the poor conspiracy theorists

The trend towards doubt of “expert advice” is spreading faster in lower income groups.

Voters with annual incomes below $30,000 are most likely to think there are legitimate reasons to be concerned about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, while those with incomes above $200,000 are most likely to believe people who worry about vaccine safety are spreading conspiracy theories.

In the US 71% of adults say they are vaccinated, and 26% say they are not, and to state the bleeding obvious — the people who didn’t get vaccinated are also the most concerned about the health risks of vaccination.  Those who got vaccinated are only half as likely to think vaccines are linked to deaths.  Nonetheless, that’s nearly 4 in 10 people who are vaccinated that think injections can kill. That’s a lot of people.

h/t Matthew L


The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on December 28-30, 2022 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Photo by melsawm

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January 3, 2023 at 12:13PM

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